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Psychological and Medical Evaluations: Asylum Seekers, Ethics, and the Law

Psychological and Medical Evaluations: Asylum Seekers, Ethics, and the Law

By | Articles, Peer-Reviewed Articles

This article highlights the importance of psychological and medical evaluations for asylum seekers in the United States, and identifies physicians and other healthcare professionals as uniquely situated for this work. This paper outlines the benefits and drawbacks to such evaluations and addresses their utility in immigration law, ultimately calling for increased clinician involvement in pro bono evaluations.

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Conceptual Considerations for Trainees in Asylum Medicine

By | Articles, Peer-Reviewed Articles

In recent years, the unique role of medical professionals in the asylum adjudication process has been thrown into sharp relief as asylum applications surge, with over one million pending cases backlogged in the U.S. asylum system as of August 2019. Medical evaluations dramatically increase the likelihood of an individual obtaining asylum. The author examines the role medical trainees play in this process.

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More Similar Than Different: Discoveries in Medical Culture when Practicing Global Health at Pediatric Hospital in Ethiopia

By | Peer-Reviewed Articles

Ethiopian physicians, nurses, and midwives routinely encounter cultural challenges created by language barriers, an urban vs rural divide, and differences in education that impact the patient-provider relationship. Despite limitations in personnel and resources, these clinicians have devised approaches to overcome these barriers to best serve their patients.

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The Use of Suffering in Pediatric Bioethics and Clinical Literature

The Use of Suffering in Pediatric Bioethics and Clinical Literature: A Qualitative Content Analysis

By | Articles, Peer-Reviewed Articles

“Suffering” is a concept that is frequently invoked in discussions about medical decision-making in pediatrics. However, empirical accounts of how the term is used are lacking, creating confusion about the concept and leaving parents and providers unsure about the appropriate ways to account for it in pediatric decision-making. We conducted a qualitative content analysis of pediatric bioethics and clinical literature in selected journals from 2007 to 2017 to determine how authors define and operationalize the term when referring to issues in pediatric treatment.

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Competing Interests in Pediatric Eating Disorders Patients

By | Articles, Peer-Reviewed Articles

Use of sedation and restraints is sometimes the only means available to stabilize medically fragile eating disorders patients. While minors are not given the option to refuse care that competent adults are, forced tube feeding nonetheless challenges the minor patient’s senses of identity and control. The following case study chronicles the management of an 11-year-old patient transferred from inpatient child psychiatry unit to the adolescent medicine service for nutritional rehabilitation.

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