All Posts By

Aka Moore

Pediatric Ethicscope: the Journal of Pediatric Bioethics and Pediatric Ethics Physician shadowing

Clinical and Surgical Shadowing: A First-Person Account and Ethical Analysis

By | Articles, Peer-Reviewed Articles

Shadowing has become, if not an explicit requirement, important for medical school admission. Shadowing has come under criticism for undermining bioethical principles such as patient autonomy and privacy. Critics argue the practice of shadowing violates the physician’s fiduciary duty to the patient. These criticisms are largely based either theoretical concerns or anecdote. This account reviews the criticisms of shadowing and assesses the claims.

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Ethics Consult Report: Withdrawal of Artificial Nutrition and Hydration

Ethics Consult Report: Withdrawal of Artificial Nutrition and Hydration

By | Ethics Consult Reports, Peer-Reviewed Articles

A medical team considers withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration supporting a 6-month-old girl with complex cardiac disease, devastating neurological injury, and ongoing, unmanageable pain. Diffuse neurological injury and severe ischemia in all four limbs offers a bleak prognosis. Drawing on the bioethics literature on the subject, the following case presentation and analysis illustrates how a medical team and family can approach such a situation.

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Withdrawal of Artificial Nutrition and Hydration Ethics Consult Commentary

Clinical Ethics Consult Commentary: Promoting Human-Centered Care

By | Articles, Commentary, Ethics Consult Reports, Peer-Reviewed Articles

When technologically advanced medicine fails to “rescue [a patient] intact from the conditions of her birth,” professionals must rely even more squarely on the foundation of good medicine – human-centered caring. While we do not disagree with Mr. Teti’s ethical analysis, we believe that ethics consultants can (and should) do more to support the medical team in achieving this foundational goal.

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Pediatric Ethicscope: the Journal of Pediatric Bioethics and Pediatric Ethics ethics of disclosing SUDEP

The Ethics of Disclosing and Discussing SUDEP with Families of Children Newly Diagnosed with Epilepsy

By | Articles, Peer-Reviewed Articles

The decision to discuss sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP) presents a complicated ethical picture with potentially conflicting principles. The neurologist must decide how to disclose and discuss the problem of SUDEP, balancing the desire to help families by empowering them, without doing harm by overwhelming them with fear.

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